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earnings cycle. also in this environment the u.s. economy is growing more like 2% and a lot less like 4 in that environment pricing is going to be challenged and the top line sales is not going to be universal for all firms. it will be balance sheet by balance sheet and case by case. security collection becomes far more important. >> i was going to say as you point out the profit growth picture has been pretty good but we are getting at the mature point in that cycle and the forecast is about 1% or 2% overall growth. there are always ways to make more money than the index tracking would lead you to believe. where do you think the pockets of possible better than average profits would be? >> so we do like equities. when you compare that to fixed income certainly in government space so we like equities and we like global equities. it will have to be a multi asset strategy which is kind of all of the above. looking at commodities and debt and equities and looking in companies in europe. there are good companies with strong balance sheets in europe, as well. looking into russia, indonesia, m
marriage fidelity. trouble is, it's not going to happen in the current political environment. we're having a situation in which, as the debate over the sequester unfolded, you had republicans saying, this is terrible. it's going to open us up and it's serving iranians, but not a penny of tax increases. no way. in that political environment, it's an unrealistic thing to expect any kind of grand bargain and we don't want to hold short-term economic policies hostage to having this grand bargain that i'd love to see but isn't going to happen right now. >> let me ask you about the last graphic about japan. japan looms large and you spend a lot of time working on it. you came to my attention first when you wrote a book about the, you know, japan-style depression economics and the age of diminished expectations. >> no, japan was the full-scale dress rehearsal for what we're going through now. japan is, people who were studying japan in the 1990s are the ones who are dreading what actually happens. >> when you look at japan. one thing you say, you're glad that the fed, the japanese central bankers
, very threatening environment, it's very black out here, very dark. bill: a child escaping a crash, but finding herself in new danger when she's forced to find help in the dead of night. heather: and the future of the republican party, karl rove weighing in, why he is saying, don't give up just yet. bill: 10:30 in new york. karl rove over the weekend arguing that the republican party isn't over just yet, shooting down any suggestion that the party is past its praoeup. >> let's be clear, before we assign the republican party to the dust bin of history, 30 out of 50 governors in the united states are republicans. republicans have elected in 2010 the largest number of state legislators since 1920. the majority of state legislators are republicans. we have two robust parties, each with their own problems. the republican party has its problems, the democratic party has its problems and we are likely to see a competitive, political environment for decades to come. bill: i want to talk about this with former arizona senator jon kyl, a fox news contributor. welcome back here. >> thanks, go
institutions and environment with access to care. we had conversation and a disruption and we also have to acknowledge treatment and trust. it also have access to the system. it is not just going to be about what the benefits look like. but whether we can educate americans that are impacted. we need to have access to these health care services that they need at the end of the day. we are talking about what we know. including age and race. people of color are less likely to experience that in health care system. there is a story behind that that we have not necessarily gone to the heart. but we are really going to address health care, we really need to take about this and there has to be a way to address these populations that continue to experience this. our health care is overwhelming impacted by this. we are going to start to appropriate this. >> i think that the fact it is said that, i wonder if that is a the question that we have an answer just yet. like what is the accountability in the system itself and how is a transforming. how do we tackle that. >> [inaudible] >> we have conver
creation," pope benedict xvi called upon the faithful, and i quote -- "to protect the environment and to safeguard natural resources and the climate, while at the same time taking into due account the solidarity we owe to those living in the poorer areas of our world and to future generations." in his inaugural mass this morning, pope francis said, and i quote -- "please, i would like to ask all those who have positions of responsibility in economic, political and social life and all men and women of goodwill, let us be protectors of creation, protectors of god's plannen scribed in nature -- plan inscribed in nature, protectors of one another and of the environment. as early news reports indicated, the new pope chose his papal name, francis, out of respect for st. francis' sense of obligation to god's creation, and he noted in one of his very earliest comments that our relationship with god's creation is not so good right now. and of course, the pope is not the only one. ecumenical patriot remark bartholomew 1 of constantinople, the spiritual leader of orthodox christians, urges u
the cash method of accounting. what to make of, well the entire environment for growing a business in this country? ali wing, founder and ceo of giggle, the baby chain of stores and online sales. she joins us now. in terms of what you're seeing, just broadly, ali, the tax environment for you, it is getting worse, no? >> it is. i'm actually just in the middle of annual compensation reviews. i know every employee right now is feeling less in their take-home pay. that is a pressure of a different type for businesses. but it's the same old theme, whether it was not charging online only businesses sales tax or people off-line had to have it. just needing to even the playing field. not a disinincident tiff to big next generation of big businesses in america and right now it is still uneven. dagen: we talked about though the complications created by government, local government, state governments, the federal government in running a business today. we're celebrating the anniversary of the health care law and, what we've seen washington do in recent years. is it getting worse to grow a bus
. but this is what you expect from the federal government. your education, roads, bridges, a healthy environment, and what's mandated by the constitution, our armed forces to protect us. but this is where it gets really scary. all of this blue part here for medicare, social security is what we take in. in other words, all of our cash on hand, if you will, the money that you pay the federal government every time you get a paycheck or pay your income taxes, this is all devoted to medicare, medicaid, social security. in other words, everything else, your education, the environment, our roads, bridges, ports, armed forces all of that money to pay for that basically is borrowed. it's just borrowed, or worse just printed. this is the sad reality that we are facing today. but with republican house leadership and working with democrats who are actually willing to come to the table and compromise and not just work with us, work for you, we can save social security and medicare. by the way, when you hear democrats, or see the videos of them throwing your grandmother off a cliff or telling you that republi
] ♪ ♪ [applause] >> so being in a classroom environment, i usually get in a lot of debates with professors and teachers, so i'm going to give everybody a tip on how to debate a liberal for the upcoming year. if they ever say liberalism works, just say look at illinois. i'm ooh from illinois, and if you want to see liberal policies at work, come to illinois. we have about $100 billion in unfunded pensions, our last four governors in jail, it's one of the most corrupt governments not just in the country -- time magazine rated the most corrupt goth -- governments in the world. number one was venezuela, number two was north korea, number three was illinois. [laughter] now, illinois' really bad, but if i take a drive about an hour and a half north on i-94, i start to get a smile on my face, and i pass into the dairy state. [cheers and applause] i get a smile because i know i'm in a state that has a leader. a state that has a leader that stood up to special interests, that looked the unions in the eye and made reforms that were not really popular at the time but are now proven effective. conserv
people together. i think partly it was the circumstances and the environment we had to confront. devissive had very times. the schedule has changed a lot. we would work longer weeks and people were there for a longer period of time. the venues for communication were much more readily at hand. we had -- we used to have two lunch tables that are just for senators and you'd is it family style and people would have lunch together. and for whatever reason that lunchroom was closed. we used to have social events where we get together and one was around our spouses and we'd salute or spouse. we'd do things like that. but i think the single biggest thing people leave washington so much more routinely on thursday or friday and don't come back till monday or tuesday and you are left to govern on wednesday. you can't govern a country as big and sophisticated as this one is one or two days a week. they have been in session 11 days in february which we've got to ground the airplane. we're going to have to say you're going to have to stay here. maybe what we ought to do is have blocks of tim
-chairs heard of the need for an environment of intellectual curiosity that encourages innovation. so, third, i want to hold hack-a-thons in tax-heavy cities like san francisco, austin, denver and new york to forge relationships with developers and stay on the cutting edge. fourth, once our new operation is up and running, we'll embark on a data and digital road show to demonstrate what campaigns and state parties can do to enhance their own operations. the report recommended getting early buy-in from all partners. fifth, we'll upgrade gop.com as a platform, redesigning it to better utilize social media and serve an increasingly mobile audience. sixth, we're going to be setting up an rnc field office in the san francisco area. as we learned with visits to the silicon valley and conversations with top tech firms, many of the best minds are on the other side of the country. having an office there will make it easier for technologynologists -- technologists to join in our efforts and serve as a hub for our data and digital political training. by doing all of this, we'll enter 2014 and 2016 with a
both, create a better environment for jobs but also live within our means. >> talk act reality, as well. you just heard it. no ratio of spending cuts to revenue increases republicans will accept. democrats will not cut or reform entitlements on their own. so there is no grand bargain to be had. >> it's the problem overall. one of the frustrations in washington is the fact you have on one hand the entitlement issue and you said democrats aren't going to move the direction without more tax revenue. on the other hand, you have republicans saying hey, if we're going to have tax reform we should reform it, get rid of the loopholes but put it into lowering rates to stimulate the economy. >> chris mathews, you made a point this week on a panel discussion saying you don't think the republicans are telling the whole story. they don't want to cut medicare or social security either. >> the problem is both sides are in positions they're happy to be in. that's why they all prefer sequestration to the next situation, which is if you're a republican, the democrats are basically saying -- i'm speaking
life could have, indeed, once existed there. >> for the first time we are seeing an ancient environment on mars which is habitable. it just looks different than the planet does today instead of red, it's gray. there was plenty of water. >> curiosity landed on mars back in august, you might recall. the mission last one martian year. that translates into 687 earth days, shepard. we're about halfway through. >> shepard: all right. casey stegall in dallas tonight. cabin owners are now looking for what's left after a huge fire ripped through a mountain side resort. and that tops our news across newark. america. tennessee, the fire broke out late sunday night at a cabin near the north carolina border. heavy winds quickly fanned the flames to dozens of other structures. black hawk helicopters help battled thing all day yesterday. officials say some rain fall last night finally helped contain the thing. it charred some 200 acres and destroyed more than 60 cabins. nobody hurt. maryland. a massive water main break beneath a busy intersection north of d.c. the pipe burst last night sending water 2
environment, you increase the likelihood of it being used. there's this bizarre argument which goes around that you can incredibly wield military intervention as a threat and the more credible it is the less likely it gets used because it forces diplomacy. i don't think history bears that out at all. i get really, really worried, almost panicked when i hear the thought of military intervention against iran being thrown around. >> what the hell? >> it's -- you know, it was like my second day here. >> yeah. >> and midway through the day, a zumba class. >> boom. >> emerged. throbbing against this wall because that's the msnbc universal gym. >> yeah. >> and i was taken aback at first. i'm now growing sort of used to it. although it's not -- i wouldn't be totally grief stricken at leaving it behind. >> did you ever think about giving up the bike riding for midday zumba? >> yes. >> because it's right here. >> listening to zumba day in and day out has made me not want to do zumba more than anything. >> yeah. like who could blame him, right? more of our conversation today at 12:00 noon. we're goin
, and the environment." he said a little tenderness can open up a horizon of hope. earlier, the pope had traveled in an open jeep instead of the well protected popemobile. look at him stepping out. several times he blessed a disabled man. he kissed babies. he wore simple vestments and black, not red shoes. 132 official delegations were there from around the world. there you see the head of the u.s. delegation vice president joe biden. i'm joined by father john with the archdiocese of trenton, new jersey. good to see you. >> good to see you, chris. >> we watched the mass together. it was interesting to see what the pope's twitter feed took out of that not so long homily. he tweeted, true power is service. the pope must serve all people especially the poor, the weak, the vulnerable. we're all looking for clues to what his papacy will be like. what did you learn today? >> i think it's about the simplicity and focusing on the central mission of the church, which is opening wide the arms of christ to all people, to reach out to them, to bring them in, to draw them in, allow them to feel the love of go
as we've really created institutions and our community and environment where everybody else wanted to achieve access to care. the party had conversation another these deceptions deceptions and health care services or deception in providers. we also have to knowledge the historical experiences of mistreatment and mistrust in communities of color as well as lgbt communities have experienced discrimination, but also discrimination trying to get access to the system. as a look at health care reform implementation, it's not just that the benefits for quite. it's about whether or not the lgbt americans were overwhelmingly and acted will have access to this health care services they need. at the end of 80s talking about the treatment cascade for the analysis by age and race is that a younger american people of color is less likely to experience depression and less likely to be engaged in the health care system. there's a story behind that we haven't necessarily cut to the heart of, but if are going to address health disparities, will have a chance that has to be seated in conversation or
environment. >> i am glad you brought up the fact that you're dealing with the c.r.'s. it has been suggested that this is on you. let's take the timeout the last three years. was it your idea to pass a 14- day continuing resolution or a 21-day continuing resolution? or a seven-day, 165-day, a one- day, a six-day? how you run a government or a branch of government with c.r.'s that go for that short amount of time? how do you adequately budget for that? >> it is very difficult. we err on the side of being conservative, as we have here, to make sure we are not deficient at the end of any given continuing resolution. it is difficult. we are a very large operation. we are taking in over 400,000 people a year. and if it has to go on for the full year. when you are in an environment where you do not know what your budget is going to be on the various marks and the house and the senate are different, when you are looking at sequestration, it is a challenge and you do your best under the circumstances to come up with the right answer. >> as you went through the releases and you sit here today, do you
for that cycle of prosperity that i described to happen. the job of our government is to create an environment where people are encouraged to and it is easier for them to risk the money they have access to in order to start up a new business or grow an existing business so they can hire more people and create more jobs for others. there's a lot of things that government can do to help create that environment but there are few that are being discussed. i want to point to three. the first thing is predictability. what do i mean by predictability? what i mean by that is that when someone decides i'm going to open up a business, one of the things that encourages them to hire people is that they know what tomorrow's going to look like. they know what the taxes are going to be, they know what the laws are going to be, they know what the economy's going to look like, and so they feel encouraged because they can pl plan, because they know what tomorrow looks like. imagine now for a moment if you are a businessman or a businesswoman and is deciding whether to hire five people next year or not. one of t
you'll see a depressed environment where the unemployment rate is over 26%, severe austerity cuts and overhauls of gutted worker benefits, safety net programs, harming seniors and the country's poorest populous, taxes on families an businesses have increased at a sharp rate and violent social unrest has become common place. most recently we've seen a proposal to bail out cyprus banks that could raid the savings account of its own population. these are the realities of debt-ridden countries. these are the realities of liberal policies that tax too much, spend too much, borrow too much and produce far too few jobs. we cannot afford the path that we're on. thankfully we have time to change. america's course and the house republican budget provides a so-year plan. it puts brakes on our spending levels, laying out a thoughtful program, reforms to ensure successful government services are solvent for generations to come, prioritizes a comprehensive restructuring of or tax code to simplify the system and improbables our fiscal system in a way -- improves our fiscal system in way that wou
about as chairman of the environment and public works committee because without being able to move people and move goods, our nation will not be a leading economic power. so i thank you and i yield back to senator coons. mr. coons: i thank my good friend from california and the other members of the budget committee who have worked so hard to pull together this proposal, this package, this budget resolution that comes to the floor today. mr. president, i think this is a great week for the united states congress. we are at loose in stark contrast, presenting to the people of the united states a budget path forward adopted boy the republican-led house and a budget path forward adopted by the democrat-led budget committee, and hopefully not just debated but adopted in this chamber this week. let me briefly summarize the main points made by my colleagues. first, as the senator from california emphasized, one of the core elements of the ryan budget plan that gives us real pause and concern is that it doesn't keep our promises to our seniors, to our veterans, to our most vulnerable popula
strategic environment and about america's interest forward. finally i would add as a qualification for today's discussion, unlike most former holders of high office in washington, he has been willing over and over again to step outside conventional wisdom when the issue warranted it, taking some risk with his own reputation. general mcmaster is one of the most prominent of a very small, very easily come a very important class of individuals who have earned the title warrior soldier. he, too, has been willing to critically examine the past, and has done so with such power that rather than in his military career, the work has ultimately advanced it. his ph.d. thesis became a widely influential book. the title gives you some idea of his appetite for straight talk. fors equally known brilliance as a combat commander, earning a silver star in the 1991 gulf war and even wider recognition for his success in battles in the iraq war. in the rest of that war, he went back-and-forth between field command an important staff positions culminating in his role as the leader of general petraeus's brain trus
maintain freedom of movement in a variety of complex environments around the globe. that is the joint operational access concept. a subset of that is how the navy and air force are collaborating to achieve that. the army and marine corps also have a role perry to your point about when i am in china about not aimed ate, is china. the united states has interests in the global commons, interest in maintaining freedom of movement, freedom of action, and the things we do at the development of technologies and tactics are fundamentally to guarantee that that freedom will continue to exist, regardless of who is threatening. may i ask you about what you consider is the impact of the non resolution of the palestinian best israeli conflict on the security of the gulf, and what specific challenge that iran presents now can be enhanced or ignored by the resolution of the conflict? >> identify yourself. >> thank you. peacel, the mideast process and those attempting or intending to continue to seek progress in that regard or dumb started, depending on who you are, is outside the realm of the milita
more on that. if we could talk about is the changing energy environment globally and especially in the united states, as the united states becomes more self-sufficient rather than independent, and how that impacts the relationship with our countries? >> yes, you know, i think that -- we have had some divergences. some of it comes down to messaging, as we were saying before. we have the same sorts of reservations and worries about exactly what is the u.s. policy and will the u.s. actually back up those policies as the other allies do. that extend beyond the middle east. the divergence has been the ascendancy of islamic groups. the united states have been relatively sanguine about that. many are worried about the intentions of groups like the muslim brotherhood. when it comes to iran, i think there is a concern amongst the allies we focus on what is exclusively on the nuclear issue, almost as if we are having an arms control negotiations. many of our allies see it in a much broader sense, causing trouble in the region. again, i don't think that the administration doesn't see those
institutions that have been welcomed into tenet and an environment where everybody else wanted to reduce us access to care. and you start having a conversation around that and where this would be disrupted in health care services or disruptions in providers. we also have to acknowledge the historical experiences of mistreatment and mistrust in commuters of color as well as lgbt communities have experienced discrimination from health care providers, and also just experienced discrimination just trying to get access to the system. so as we look at health care implementation is not just going to be about what the benefits look like but it's going to be about whether not the lgbt of americans are being overwhelmingly impacted by the hiv epidemic are going to have access to these services that they need. thing about the treatment cascade and one of the things we know from recent analysis of the treatment cascade, by age and race is that younger americans are less likely experience -- less likely to engage in health care system. there's a story behind that don't have the necessary gotten to the h
, and epa, our corporations are putting more chemicals into our environment and into our food, making us sick. chemicals are chemicals. we have got to get our own -- this is democrats in indiana. caller: good morning. thank you for having me on. with president obama going to israel, the point i don't get still, what about the palestinians? is a separateic topic. this is u.s. policy towards syria. what do you think should be u.s. policy towards syria? caller: right now, i don't think we should be the police of the world. --should work to resolve this is an internal issue in syria. if he goes over the border, we should look into it. but we should deal not by ourselves but through other nations, the other arab nations. that is what they are there for. i am not quick about sending our troops to get killed and another war again. here john is a republican in the suburbs and alexandra, virginia. caller: good morning, thank you for taking my call. in regard to u.s. involvement in the commander testified to the senate last week or two is toogo that it propagated, the situation in we don't terms o
that could easily get caught and mangled in devices. monday equipment, the environment was a threat to children as well as the factories that put out the fumes and toxins. when inhaled these children would often result in illness, chronic conditions or disease. and harvesting crops in extreme temperatures during long hours were considered normal for children. the labor movement spearheaded the fight against the child labor practices that were going on. as early as 1836 we had union members of the national trades union convention made the first formal public proposal recommending that states establish a minimum age for factory work. that year massachusetts enacted the first state law restricting child labor for workers under 15. over the next several decades, the efforts of labor movements successfully achieved minimum age laws in other states and in 1881, the a.f.l. proposed a national law banning all children under 14 from employment. and in 1892, the democratic party adopted the a.f.l.'s child labor platform and began to push for a national child labor law. and finally in 1938, co
in an environment that can be only described as alice in wonder land, how does the fed managing interest rates play into the interpretation of your survey. or does it at all in your opinion? >> well, i'm not sure if they do look at our survey or not. the reading i would take away is more and more are of the view they may start tweaking with the bond buying program. >> now from my perspective. let me make an assumption. let me say in my opinion i don't think they're going to pull back in a big way any time soon from some of these programs. so i guess the question i'm going to ask you this, is the bearish news showing up in con treat terms, not just opinion in your survey, should the interest rates remain tame and they actually have been dropping, what you are saying is that this could be a contrary indicator that's big out there. it can create a spiral where they need to run in and buy futures if rates start to drop. could that not be true as well? >> well, rick, i think you're right in thinking that is a possibility. we don't know for issue if this is a contrary reader or not. if you have reasons t
. given the environment, the ability to have serious discussion that is could lay a basis for moving forward i think may well have been done in this trip and we'll see what comes now in the aftermath of the secretary of state. the measure of the trip won't be what happens this week or next, it's going to be what happens over the next couple months. >> yeah. guys, to both of you, the president said during the press conference with king abdullah, that the u.s. is in a no-win situation in syria. it's criticized when it takes military action. it's krit siced for not taking military action. so what then are the options on the table, martin? >> well, the americans are insisting they need to act within the international community. it can't be up to the united states always to send in troops, and i don't really think that people in the region are expecting that, but there needs to be some kind of effort made to enable -- my feeling is a clear winner in syria. we're all talking about the emphasis is on helping the resistance against president assad reach victory. obama keeps saying it's not m
jobs, clean up the environment, and be able to keep our way of life going on the chesapeake bay. so, madam president, you can see why today we just had three great marylanders, each doing a very different thing, but what i'm so proud of with, you know, captain cullen, larry symms, christina quigley is that each in their own way was trying to make a difference, wanted to protect america. the other was to protect jobs and a way of life on the chesapeake bay. and the other to inspire young women not only to be ready for the playing fields of la crosse but for the playing fields of life. all three, in her own way, were inspirational leaders. all three, in their own way, made a difference in the lives of the people that they came in touch w i just want to say, god bless them and god treat them kindly and may their souls rest in peace. madam president, i yield the floor. ms. mikulski: madam president, i note the absence of a quorum. the presiding officer: the clerk will call the roll. quorum call: quorum call: quorum call:
. over and over, our co-chairs heard of the need for an "environment of intellectual curiosity" that encourages innovation. so, third, i want to hold hackathons in tech-savvy cities like san francisco, austin, denver, and new yorkto forge relationships with developers and stay on the cutting edge. fourth, once our new operation is up and running, we will embark on a data and digital road show to demonstrate what campaigns and state parties can do to enhance their own operations. the report recommended getting early buy-in from all partners. fifth, we will upgrade gop. com as a platform, redesigning it to better utilize social media and serve an increasingly mobile audience. sixth, we're setting up an rnc field office in the san francisco area. as we learned with visits to silicon valley and conversations with top tech firms, many of the best minds are on the other side of the country. having an office there will make it easier for technologists to join our efforts, and it can serve as a hub for our data and digital political training. by doing all this, we will enter 2014 and 2
extreme position to take to prevent the environmental protection agency from protecting the environment. my amendment is an amendment that says that -- that the carbon emission standards must be cost-effective and we all agree that they should be cost-effective. it should be base upon best available science and benefit low-income and middle-class families. i think we could all agree, i would hope, on the amendment that i would offer and i would hope we would do that and allow the environmental protection agency to carry out its critical mission on behalf of the people of this country. mr. inhofe: madam president? the presiding officer: the senator from oklahoma. mr. inhofe: madam president, i'd like to ask one question of the author and then make a comment. first of all, this does not authorize the e.p.a. to regulate in any way. this sets the standards; is that correct? mr. cardin: the senator is correct. mr. inhofe: okay. madam president, i support this amendment. i suggest that we voice vote it. the presiding officer: if there's no further debate, all those in favor say aye. all those
, truly. because my whole life i've cared about environment and i've cared about infrastructure. and the way the senate works, they put those two together. so not only do i get to talk about clean air and clean water and safe drinking water and cleaning up superfund sites and protecting the health of our families, but i also get to talk about jobs, jobs, jobs that are created when we build roads and bridges and highways. and water systems. but there is something that does not bring us together on that committee and that's the issue of climate change. and so what i've decided to do is to come down to the floor every monday that it's possible for me to do it, and the floor is available, to talk just a few minutes about the devastating consequences of unchecked climate disruption. and i want to discuss and put into the record every week the latest scientific information. on march 4, i started these talks and i talked about a front-page story in the "usa today" that spotlighted the impacts of climate change unfolding around us. the story is the first in a yearlong series called "why
Search Results 0 to 36 of about 37 (some duplicates have been removed)